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Washington Hilton Undergoes Makeover

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Basketball legend Ervin 'Magic' Johnson (left) and D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty (right) outside of the Washington Hilton.
Patrick Madden
Basketball legend Ervin 'Magic' Johnson (left) and D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty (right) outside of the Washington Hilton.

By Patrick Madden

A D.C. landmark has undergone a-top-to-bottom makeover. The Washington Hilton has completed a three year, $150 million restoration, and it was made possible by a basketball legend.

The iconic hotel in Dupont Circle became nationally known in 1981 when President Ronald Reagan was shot there by John Hinkley Jr. It was designated an historic landmark several years ago and houses one of Washington’s largest ballrooms.

Equally noteworthy is one of the people behind the money: basketball superstar-turned-urban entrepreneur Ervin "Magic" Johnson.

This afternoon Johnson talked about the hotel’s economic impact.

"Eight-hundred and fifty construction jobs, amazing in a bad economy, and over 600 employees work inside to deliver the best customer service you will find anywhere," says Johnson.

This isn’t Johnson’s first investment in D.C. He’s has opened 10 Starbucks in the metro area and invested more than $300 million in the region over the years.

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