WASA Planning Action After Report Says CDC Misled Public On Lead In Water | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

WASA Planning Action After Report Says CDC Misled Public On Lead In Water

Play associated audio

By Patrick Madden

After a congressional report slammed the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention for misleading District residents about lead in the water, D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority is planning to take a fresh look at the problem.

After hazardous levels of lead were discovered in 2004, WASA launched a campaign to replace many of the city's aging pipelines. It pulled the program two years ago because of costs and because it found ways, using chemicals, to reduce lead in the water. Now WASA is gearing up to find out which buildings still face a risk of high lead levels.

General Manager George Hawkins says the plan is to create "a profile" of the types of buildings and locations most at risk. That is, figure out which attributes point to likely higher levels of lead, such as the age of the home or the kind of pipes installed.

"We don't want to dig up all the streets in the city, we don't want to dig up systems that we don't have to," says Hawkins. "We want to be able to pinpoint the best extent we can, those places where they might be at risk."

Hawkins says WASA will then work with those customers and try to eliminate the risks.

NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

Administration Officials Defend Funding Request To Stem Border Crisis

President Obama has asked for $3.7 billion to deal with the southern border crisis. There are predictions the number of unaccompanied children entering the U.S. could reach 90,000 by October.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.