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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, May 25, 2010

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(May 25-28) SAMURAI AND SWORDPLAY The Japanese Embassy near Dumbarton Oaks celebrates the 150th anniversary of the island nation's first diplomatic mission to these United States during Samurai Week. Seventy-seven samurai crossed the sea a century and a half ago on this diplomatic mission; you can cross traffic on Embassy Row tonight at 6:30 for some swordplay, comedy and drama a la bushido in An Evening with Samurai.

(May 25-June 19) A WELL-TRAVELED ROAD The art of Alex Todorovich was influenced by her struggle with cancer, but the artist's decorative folk art and ornamentation focus on existential connections, not crises. You can check out this deeply personal collection in How to Get Off a Well-Traveled Road... through June 19th at The Healing Arts Gallery at Smith Farm Center in Northwest DC.

(May 26) PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA And the superlative Philadelphia Orchestra drops by the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda tomorrow night at 7:30 for an evening of classics including Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, and Glinka.

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