: News

Local Students Perform At Fords Theatre

Play associated audio

By Cathy Carter

The famous words of America's great leaders now have new meaning to a group of students in Prince George's County.

Tony Clark is a junior at Central High School in Capitol Heights Maryland.

"Before this class I was mumbling when I talked, now I speak up and you can hear me all the way up the hallways," says Clark.

All year the students have been learning the speeches of famous orators like Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The program is a partnership with Ford's Theatre Education Department. Sarah Jencks is the director.

"Ultimately I see this program as a way of engaging young people in democracy because they're beginning to develop their voices, their democratic voices and so often they don't see themselves as participants," says Jencks.

The class has also emphasized using speaking skills to nurture leadership. Kate Conrad is their teacher.

"The transformation I've seen since the beginning of the year is that the students now believe in themselves, they believe in the course, and they believe in the power of oratory," says Conrad.

Students will deliver original speeches and famous works like the Gettysburg address in a program called Oratory in American Culture tonight at Ford's Theatre.

NPR

For Carl Phillips, Poetry Is Experience Transformed — Not Transcribed

Phillips' new collection is both raw and refined, drawing on intimate experience while shunning autobiography. "I become uncomfortable when people make an equation between author and poem," he says.
NPR

#NPRreads: Middle East Air Quality, Lead Poisoning, And Jell-O

Around the newsroom and around the world, here's what we're reading this week.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.