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Fans Fear For Screen On The Green's Future

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By Asma Khalid

Some fans of the summer tradition, Screen on the Green fear the festival is in jeopardy once again.

Last May, HBO canceled the free movies on the National Mall because of funding.There was a virtual outcry online, and Screen on the Green was resurrected.

But now, some, like Jesse Rauch worry the festival’s future is up in the air again. Rauch heads the Save the Screen on the Green campaign. It’s a local grassroots movement.

He’s worried because HBO has not yet confirmed Screen on the Green for this summer. A spokesperson for HBO says the company hopes to offer the free movies as normal and plans to make a formal announcement in the next few weeks.

But, Rauch isn’t taking any chances. He’s organizing the group's 4,000 Facebook followers into action. They’re writing letters and reaching out to potential cosponsors.

"I mean it’s almost indescribable, but people, they love it. They love coming, they love the atmosphere," says Rauch.

There are other outdoor movies throughout the city, but Rauch says none are quite like Screen on the Green.

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