: News

Clergy Leaders Lobby Congress Over Gun Bill

Play associated audio

By Peter Granitz

Leaders from the D.C. faith community are lobbying members of Congress to pull a bill that would make it easier to buy semi-automatic guns in the District.

Senators John McCain and Jon Tester are sponsoring the bill that would also allow D.C. residents to buy guns and ammo in Virginia and Maryland. The two call the bill a measure to restoring rights in the District.

But leading clergy, like E. Gail Anderson Holness, call it just the opposite. She’s the president of the Council of Churches of Greater Washington, and has been lobbying Tester to pull his support. She says local faith leaders understand the community’s needs better than anyone else.

“We’re the ones who at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday morning get the opportunity to speak to crowds of people that no one else in the world does,” says Holness.

There is a similar measure in the U.S. House. That bill also enjoys bipartisan support. Still, Congress has a full-slate of other politically potent bills before this fall’s midterm election.

NPR

Franzen's Latest Novel: An Ambitious But Tarnished 'Purity'

Jonathan Franzen weaves together a cavalcade of stories and characters in his latest novel. Critic Maureen Corrigan says that despite its breadth, Purity fails to "emotionally move the reader."
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner (Rebroadcast)

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

NPR

Is Marco Rubio The Candidate Republicans Date But Don't Marry?

Polls suggest GOP primary voters really like Rubio, but when it comes to casting a vote they seem less sure. Time might tell whether he can turn his paper appeal into real appeal.
WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How To Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says traffic in the U.S. is worse than it's been in years. But some say there are reasons to be optimistic. For this month's Environmental Outlook: How revitalized urban centers and new modes of transportation are changing how we get around our cities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.