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Parents Lash Out At Feds For No Response

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By Peter Granitz

Parents of those killed in last March's drive-by shooting that killed four people in Southeast Washington are lashing out at federal officials for not recognizing the incident.

Nardine Jeffries' 16-year-old daughter was killed in the shooting. Now she wants to know why federal officials will not tamper with D.C.'s local gun laws.

She says bills like the one attached to the D.C. voting rights bill, that would have stripped the District's ability to regulate hand guns, are making the area more dangerous.

At a rally in front of the White House, she says its hard to not get angry with President Barack Obama, especially since Jeffries took her now-murdered daughter into the voting booth to vote for him.

"How do you ignore Washington D.C.? Where you reside, where your children go to school, where my child lives," she says. "You don't care about D.C. You care about Rhode Island, you care about West Virginia, you care about Haiti. You care about global things, but how do you not care about D.C.?"

Jeffries says she's trying to meet with two senators who introduced a pro gun bill in the upper chamber, but so far has not had any luck.

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