Report On CDC Has D.C. Residents Looking For More Answers On Lead Contamination | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Report On CDC Has D.C. Residents Looking For More Answers On Lead Contamination

Play associated audio
William Walker (left), chairman of D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority's board of directors, along with WASA's new General Manager George Hawkins (right), have won praise from some residents.
Jonathan Wilson
William Walker (left), chairman of D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority's board of directors, along with WASA's new General Manager George Hawkins (right), have won praise from some residents.

By Jonathan Wilson

D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority says the city's drinking water has been safe since a spike in lead levels detected in 2004. But a congressional report questioning lead analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has some residents asking for more answers.

The safe lead level designated by the Environmental Protection Agency is 15 parts per billion.

WASA chief George Hawkins says D.C. levels have been well below that since 2004.

"We've changed the chemistry of the water, that reduces the amount of lead leaching into the water, which is why we're getting low numbers," says Hawkins.

But Hawkins says there are still many lead lines in the District, and that can mean high levels for certain customers. WASA provides free testing for homeowners who want their water evaluated.

Yanna Lambrinidou, president of a parent group formed in response to the lead crisis, says there are still questions residents want answered, and since trust in the CDC may be eroding, D.C. agencies have an opportunity.

"Set the record straight for us here in D.C., and we can finally start getting correct public health messages," says Lambrinidou.

The city's Department of Environment has plans for another lead study, but says it doesn't have the funding to complete it.

NPR

Telling Crimea's Story Through Children's Books

Blending history, myth and geopolitics, Lily Hyde uses fairy tales to teach children and young adults about Eastern European history. To cover the current unrest, though, she's put fiction on hold.
NPR

How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella

Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
WAMU 88.5

Former Head Of INS Weighs In On White House Immigration Policy

Doris Meissner was the head of Immigration and Naturalization Services under President Bill Clinton, and she speaks with Armando Trull about the constraints on the current president as he seeks to handle the immigration crisis.

NPR

Science Crowns Mozzarella The King Of Pizza Cheese

Why do some cheeses melt and caramelize better than others? Researchers used high-tech cameras and special software to figure it out.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.