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Expecting Record Numbers For Bike To Work Day

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Glen Harrison of WABA bikes the talk.
Glen Harrison of WABA bikes the talk.

By Stephanie Kaye

Today is Bike to Work Day and record numbers are expected to participate. The event includes 35 morning rush hour "pit stops" throughout the region. And Glen Harrison with the Washington Area Bicyclists Association thinks the free t-shirts for registered riders will fly off the tables faster than a bike messenger on K Street.

"We ordered 8,500, and we have over 8,500 registrants," says Harrison.

Bike to Work Day is meant to encourage people to stop driving, and Harrison says bike use is increasing. But also on the rise: the number of bike accidents.

"We actually like to use the term 'crashes.' We believe they are avoidable and preventable," he says.

The best way to do that, says Harrison, "Most of us know how to drive a car. There's no reason why riding a bike on the road should be any different. If we have similar rules and laws, and abide by them, everyone should be okay."

Harrison's mantra: "Watch out for each other. Yield to everyone!"

Two bike from work rallies will be held tonight, one at Columbia Heights Plaza and one in Fairfax City.

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