Attorneys In Lead Lawsuit Applaud Investigation Of CDC | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Attorneys In Lead Lawsuit Applaud Investigation Of CDC

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

Now that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are catching heat for misleading the public about lead levels in D.C.'s drinking water, lawyers for plaintiffs in a class-action suit against the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority are claiming a small victory. The $200-million suit was filed by a single father who says the lead in tap water poisoned his twin sons.

Stefanie Roemer, from the law firm Sanford Wittels & Heisler, is the suit's lead attorney. She says she's glad the truth is finally out.

"This information simply confirms what the science has said for the last thirty-something years, which is that lead is dangerous at any level," says Roehmer. "And any indication to the contrary by WASA or any agency is just flat wrong!"

John Parkhurst of Capitol Hill filed the class-action suit. He used tap water to prepare baby formula for his sons, and says as they grew, they exhibited anxiety and attention problems.

Roehmer says she hopes the recent revelations about the CDC will raise public awareness.

"Which is really something that's at the essence of this case, which is the cover-up and lack of knowledge. This has been going on for so many years, and so many people don't know!," she exclaims.

Roehmer says she encourages parents who notice behavioral and learning issues in their children, to get them tested for lead.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 30

Two film festivals open in the D.C. area this week.

NPR

Apps Aim To Guide You On 'Sustainable Food' (Whatever That Means)

Consumers who care about how their food is produced have a growing number of apps they can turn to at the supermarket. The problem? Nailing down just what sustainability means when it comes to food.
NPR

Michael Menino, Boston's Longest-Serving Mayor, Dies At 71

Described as a hard-nosed, old-school pragmatist, he was diagnosed with cancer shortly after leaving office in January.
NPR

Moving Past The Password, But At What Cost?

Apps working with a new Twitter service would simply ask for your phone number instead of a password. In exchange, the company would get some of the most valuable information about you.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.