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Attorneys In Lead Lawsuit Applaud Investigation Of CDC

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By Rebecca Sheir

Now that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are catching heat for misleading the public about lead levels in D.C.'s drinking water, lawyers for plaintiffs in a class-action suit against the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority are claiming a small victory. The $200-million suit was filed by a single father who says the lead in tap water poisoned his twin sons.

Stefanie Roemer, from the law firm Sanford Wittels & Heisler, is the suit's lead attorney. She says she's glad the truth is finally out.

"This information simply confirms what the science has said for the last thirty-something years, which is that lead is dangerous at any level," says Roehmer. "And any indication to the contrary by WASA or any agency is just flat wrong!"

John Parkhurst of Capitol Hill filed the class-action suit. He used tap water to prepare baby formula for his sons, and says as they grew, they exhibited anxiety and attention problems.

Roehmer says she hopes the recent revelations about the CDC will raise public awareness.

"Which is really something that's at the essence of this case, which is the cover-up and lack of knowledge. This has been going on for so many years, and so many people don't know!," she exclaims.

Roehmer says she encourages parents who notice behavioral and learning issues in their children, to get them tested for lead.

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