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NTSB Sets Date For Red Line Crash Decision

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By Meymo Lyons

The National Transportation Safety Board says it is poised to release a cause of last year's deadly red line train crash. An NTSB spokesperson says the board will meet July 27 "to consider a final report" on the accident.

A Metro train slammed into the back of a stopped train on the Red Line during the height of rush hour, last June 22. Nine people including the train operator died, and 80 were injured in the deadliest accident in Metro history. The NTSB held a three-day public hearing earlier this year, but was unable to determine a probable cause for the crash at that time.

In addition, the NTSB says progress has been made in investigations into three other Metro accidents, including one in January that killed two maintenance technicians when an hi-rail truck backed into them. In that case, investigators continue to look at on-track protection rules, training and other issues.

WAMU 88.5

A WAMU Guide To The 2015 National Book Festival

Need some help navigating the schedule? We've come up with an agenda that highlights authors we’ve spoken with here at WAMU.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 2, 2015

You can plan for dinner and a show (for a cause) or check out a reggae concert.

WAMU 88.5

Europe's Ongoing Migrant And Refugee Crisis And The Future Of Open Borders

The Austria-Hungary border has become the latest pressure point in Europe's ongoing migrant crisis. An update on the huge influx of migrants and refugees from the Middle East and Africa and the future of open borders within the E.U.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How to Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says the traffic in the U.S. is the worst it has been in years. Yet, some urban transportation experts say there's reason to be optimistic. They point to revitalized city centers, emerging technology and the investment in alternative methods of transportation. A conversation about how we get around today, and might get around tomorrow.

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