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First Lady Talks Immigration At Elementary School In Maryland

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By Jessica Gould

Against the backdrop of President Felipe Calderon’s visit to the United States, discussion of the nation’s immigration policies has dominated Washington. It also extended to a small elementary school in Silver Spring, Maryland.

First Lady Michelle Obama joined First Lady of Mexico Margarita Zavala at a school in Silver Spring, Maryland to talk up the benefits of healthy eating and exercise.

"Tell me what you're having for lunch," says Obama. "It looks so good."

Ms. Obama says she wanted to visit New Hampshire Estates Elementary School because it has such a strong nutrition and physical education program.

"One of the things I'm doing as First Lady is making sure that kids are healthy, eating right, and getting the right exercise," she says.

But one second-grader posed a serious question, asking whether the government plans to deport all undocumented immigrants. The student says her mother doesn't have any papers.

"Well that’s something that we have to work on, right? To make sure that people can be here with the right kind of papers, right. That's exactly right. We have to work on that. We have to fix that. Everybody has to work together in Congress to make sure that that happens," responds Obama.

At the White House, President Obama met with President Calderon and pledged to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws.

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