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Click It Or Ticket Kicks Off

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Metropolitan police officers write tickets to drivers not following the seat belt law. Drivers and all passengers must be buckled in the District.
Natalie Neumann
Metropolitan police officers write tickets to drivers not following the seat belt law. Drivers and all passengers must be buckled in the District.

By Natalie Neumann

Two local police departments are pushing people to buckle up. They kicked off the Click It or Ticket program last night.

At the intersection of Bladensburg Road and Eastern Avenue NE officers from the Metropolitan and Prince George's Police Departments were pulling over vehicles where the driver or passengers were not buckled up.

Metropolitan Assistant Police Chief Pat Burke says seat belt use in the District is higher than the national use.

"But with so many people commuting into D.C. from other areas throughout the country it's imperative that we spread this message," says Burke.

On the Maryland side of the border Sergeant Micheal Leadbeter checks passing cars.

"Even the people that we're not stopping, they know what we're doing. So the word is getting out and I'm pretty confident that one of these folks that comes through, we're going to save their life," says Leadbeter.

The penalty for not wearing a seat belt in Maryland is a $25 fine. In D.C. it's a $50 fine and two points. Both departments will be conducting more seatbelt checkpoints in the next two weeks.

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