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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, May 19, 2010

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Marc Roman's work is as classic as his name.
Marc Roman
Marc Roman's work is as classic as his name.

(May 19) GOOOOAL! D.C. SCORES! The District's largest after-school program, DC SCORES, promotes athletic pursuits and poetry to keep kids positive. Art work inspired by these young poet-athletes will be up for auction tonight at the DC SCORES Inspired Art Gala at the Corcoran Gallery in Northwest D.C. NPR's Michelle Martin will be on hand to tell you more.

(May 19-June 19) VERITAS OBSCURA The art of science serves as Marc Roman's muse in Veritas Obscura, showing through June 19th at Flashpoint Gallery in downtown D.C. Roman chronicles the "century of the electron," from splitting the atom to the Large Hadron Collider, with photos, paintings and drawings mounted on Plexiglas.

(May 20-23) SUPER-POPS There's no business like show business during the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra SuperPops, gearing up under the baton of Jack Everly to present A Tribute to Irving Berlin, Thursday through Sunday in North Bethesda and Baltimore. Broadway stars belt out the songsmith's biggest hits, including "Cheek to Cheek" and "Blue Skies."

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'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

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