George Washington University Forms New Nursing School | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

George Washington University Forms New Nursing School

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

A high demand for nursing degrees is prompting The George Washington University to form a new School of Nursing. The school will start the new academic year with approximately 400 students.

The University says its seen a spike in applications for GW's existing bachelor's degree in nursing, as health-care reform and an aging population are upping the demand for nurses.

The new GW School of Nursing will offer a master's of science degree in nursing a doctorate degree in nursing practice and a second bachelor's of science degree in nursing. These programs have been part of the Department of Nursing Education and resided within the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Now they'll exist as a stand-alone school.

Students will attend classes at both the university's main campus in Foggy Bottom, and at its campus in Loudoun County, Virginia, which includes a new simulation lab.

The university says the new school already has 30 faculty members and expects to hire more.

NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

Administration Officials Defend Funding Request To Stem Border Crisis

President Obama has asked for $3.7 billion to deal with the southern border crisis. There are predictions the number of unaccompanied children entering the U.S. could reach 90,000 by October.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.