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Horse Racing Fans Revel In All Day Races

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Workers prepare the starting gate for the main race at the 135th running of the Preakness Stakes.
Peter Granitz
Workers prepare the starting gate for the main race at the 135th running of the Preakness Stakes.

By Peter Granitz

Races are underway in Baltimore at the Preakness Stakes, but all the excitement is not saved for the final run.

There are 13 races today with the high stakes Preakness running twelfth. Some spectators say the full card gives them a chance to earn a little money for the big event--or not.

"I haven't cashed one ticket yet. Still looking," says Fritz Jacksovich.

Jacksovich has traveled from Bingamton New York for the past 19 years to come for the event. He and 15 of his friends scored the front two rows this year. The midday races, Jacksovich says, are exciting, but he likes the time to catch up with people every year.

"Ah, if you win you win; If you lose you lose," he says. "That's the way it goes, you know."

The Preakness is scheduled to run at 6:18 p.m. this evening.

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