: News

War Is Just A Game

Play associated audio
The Virtual Army Experience.
Virtual Army Experience
The Virtual Army Experience.

By Stephanie Kaye

Joint Base Andrews, formerly known as Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County, kicks off a weekend-long air show today.

Air shows are known for their impressive aerial acrobatics, as the Navy Blue Angels jet team and skydivers with the Army Golden Knights perform stunts for the military personnel and civilians who look on. But in this year's show, attendees can get involved.

A "virtual mission" simulator will allow anyone from the age of 13 and up to have their own Army experience. The simulator provides what organizers call a high-tech team mission based on rules of engagement and using life-sized military vehicles.

Civilians can "play" the America's Army game against virtual soldiers.

But real Staff Sergeant Matthew Zedwick will be on hand. The Silver Star soldier received recognition for "gallantry, heroism, and bravery" during an ambush in Iraq, and will talk about his wartime experience.

The three-day air show is open to military families and school groups today, and runs through Sunday.


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.