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War Is Just A Game

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The Virtual Army Experience.
Virtual Army Experience
The Virtual Army Experience.

By Stephanie Kaye

Joint Base Andrews, formerly known as Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County, kicks off a weekend-long air show today.

Air shows are known for their impressive aerial acrobatics, as the Navy Blue Angels jet team and skydivers with the Army Golden Knights perform stunts for the military personnel and civilians who look on. But in this year's show, attendees can get involved.

A "virtual mission" simulator will allow anyone from the age of 13 and up to have their own Army experience. The simulator provides what organizers call a high-tech team mission based on rules of engagement and using life-sized military vehicles.

Civilians can "play" the America's Army game against virtual soldiers.

But real Staff Sergeant Matthew Zedwick will be on hand. The Silver Star soldier received recognition for "gallantry, heroism, and bravery" during an ambush in Iraq, and will talk about his wartime experience.

The three-day air show is open to military families and school groups today, and runs through Sunday.

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