Loudoun Schools Prepare To Implement Stricter Food Guidelines In Schools | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Loudoun Schools Prepare To Implement Stricter Food Guidelines In Schools

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Michele Rosa (left) and Thanita Glancey (right), both parents of children with severe food allergies, helped lead the fight for new food guidelines in Loudoun Schools.
Jonathan Wilson
Michele Rosa (left) and Thanita Glancey (right), both parents of children with severe food allergies, helped lead the fight for new food guidelines in Loudoun Schools.

By Jonathan Wilson

For parents, receiving a call from your child's school usually elicits at least a little anxiety.

But Thanita Glancey has two children with severe food allergies and she says for her, a call from school brings dread.

"Every time the nurse calls, the first thing she says is, 'Your child is fine! Just calling for such-and-such,'" Glancey says. "So it can be emotionally draining sometimes."

Because of outcries from parents like Glancey, Loudoun County Public Schools has spent the last year crafting a new set of food allergy guidelines regulating food in the classroom.

They will mean the days of cupcakes for the whole class are over in Loudoun County, and teachers using food as a reward for students won't be allowed either.

School Board Chair John Stevens says he thinks some people in the county will bristle at the changes.

"Food has always something great to teach with and socialize with, and that's a lot of what happens at school, at parties, in classrooms," he says. "It's going to be an adjustment period."

Stevens says he expects the guidelines to be implemented in September.

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