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Get Your 'Preak On' At The Preakness Parade

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Event organizers hope to draw 100,000 people this weekend to
the 2010 Preakness Stakes.
Rebecca Sheir
Event organizers hope to draw 100,000 people this weekend to the 2010 Preakness Stakes.

BALTIMORE (AP) It's almost time to ''get your Preak on'' at the Preakness Parade, which has been moved to a more popular Friday night time slot.

The parade along the touristy Inner Harbor begins at 8:30 p.m. and features balloons, bands, and floats including Fifi the pink poodle, a popular kinetic sculpture from the American Visionary Art Museum.

Last year marked the first time the parade had been held the Friday night before the race instead of Saturday morning the weekend before. And organizers say the crowds responded, with more 25,000 turning out downtown.

Race organizers are also using a new ''Get Your Preak On'' ad campaign to lure young fans to the race after a ban on bringing alcohol to the track's infield hurt attendance.

Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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