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Vigil Held For Slain D.C. Council Intern

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By Patrick Madden

Friends and family are remembering the D.C. Council intern who was killed over the weekend. Court documents say Alonte Sutton was shot because he refused to give a ride to a man and his girlfriend.

Hundreds gathered outside the wooded area in Southeast D.C. where Sutton died. Holding candles and wearing t-shirts emblazoned with Suttons image, friends and family members, like his great aunt Jacklyn Pearson, urged the young people at last night's prayer vigil to follow Sutton's example.

D.C. Council Member Michael Brown says the 18-year-old was the brightest intern at the Wilson Building and had just won a coveted slot in the year-round program.

The suspect in Sutton's killing, 28-year-old Omare Cotton, has been charged with first degree murder. Cotton says he got in a fight with Sutton a day before the shooting but denies killing him.

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