Response To Metro Fare Increases Vary Among Commuters | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Response To Metro Fare Increases Vary Among Commuters

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By Stephanie Kaye

Metro's board meets today to come to a consensus on increasing fares. But who is affected and what the fallout will be varies from rider to rider.

"It's a small price to pay for the convenience," says Carl Nigbor, who is waiting for the Tenleytown Metro elevator. "I travel a lot for business and I think the Metro's the greatest system anywhere--if they would just get the elevators fixed consistently!"

Meanwhile, riders like Cory Chambliss, an intern with the Treasury Department, don't really care how much the price of their ride may go up.

"It's just a few extra dollars. Plus, the government pays for our fares!"

But for Nina - who didn't want to share her last name - the trip from Addison Road to her job at Fannie Mae could change radically. Another fare increase could push her over the edge...to driving.

"I'll get here faster and it'll end up running me about the same thing with gas. And it doesn't break down one stop away from my stop, like it did last week!"

Metro's board will be considering raising peak rail rates to $1.90 and peak bus rates to $1.50, along with a "peak of the peak" increase during morning and afternoon rush-hours.

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