Metro Says Near-Miss Was False Alarm | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro Says Near-Miss Was False Alarm

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By David Schultz

After investigating the incident, which took place on the red line near the Wheaton station, Metro says it posed no danger at any time.

James Doughterty, Metro's chief safety officer, says the train operator stopped his train 600 feet behind another train.

"He felt that he was too fast approaching the train in front of him," he says.

But Doughterty says the trains were always a safe distance apart. In fact, contrary to earlier reports, he says the operator of the stopping train never even used his emergency brake.

Metro Board Member Chris Zimmerman says even though the sudden stop wasn't necessary, the train operator deserves praise.

"He was exercising prudence and caution, which we certainly want them to do," says Zimmerman, "because if an operator perceives there's a hazard, we want them to stop!"

Metro says it will continue to monitor the area where the incident happened as a precaution.

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