Metro Says Near-Miss Was False Alarm | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Metro Says Near-Miss Was False Alarm

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

After investigating the incident, which took place on the red line near the Wheaton station, Metro says it posed no danger at any time.

James Doughterty, Metro's chief safety officer, says the train operator stopped his train 600 feet behind another train.

"He felt that he was too fast approaching the train in front of him," he says.

But Doughterty says the trains were always a safe distance apart. In fact, contrary to earlier reports, he says the operator of the stopping train never even used his emergency brake.

Metro Board Member Chris Zimmerman says even though the sudden stop wasn't necessary, the train operator deserves praise.

"He was exercising prudence and caution, which we certainly want them to do," says Zimmerman, "because if an operator perceives there's a hazard, we want them to stop!"

Metro says it will continue to monitor the area where the incident happened as a precaution.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 21

From a culture battle to the Civil War, local theater takes on historic conflicts.
NPR

Sandwich Monday: The Primanti Bros. Pitts-burger

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich from the famous Primanti Bros. of Pittsburgh.
NPR

In Tight Races, Both Parties Bank On Early Votes

Two million people have already voted in next month's election, including President Obama. Locking in votes early is huge, particularly since control of the Senate rests in a handful of close races.
NPR

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

When Tunisia's young people protested in 2011, they had one key demand: jobs. Now, despite new political leadership, that demand remains unmet — even in tech, the sector that offers the most promise.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.