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MD First State To Require Military Aptitude Test Results Be Sent To Parents

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By Kavitha Cardoza

Maryland is the first state to prohibit public schools from sending military aptitude test scores directly to recruiters.

School districts across the country can administer the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test, with topics that range from reading and math to mechanical and electronic information. Most scores and other information such as a student's social security number, address and career interests, are sent directly to military recruiters.

"In no other case do we allow private student information to be turned over to a third party without the consent of the parent," says Maryland State Senator Jaime Raskin, who sponsored a measure that would require schools to send the information to the student and their parents. "The value that's being vindicated here is the value of having the parents and family working together in deciding the student's future."

Critics say this undermines the military, but Raskin says this option is one offered by the military.

Several school systems, including Montgomery and Prince George's County schools, had already passed similar measures before the state law was passed.

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