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Job-Seekers Challenge The 'Older Worker' Stereotype

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By Ginger Moored

Several thousand job-seekers over the age of 50 attended a job fair at the National’s baseball stadium. They are hoping to confront the "older worker stereotype" by showing potential employers they can get the job done.

Kevin Garrison, a resident of southeast D.C., has had a number of jobs.

"I worked at CVS pharmacy as a pharmacy technician, I worked with Pennybowl’s services as a customer service lead associate, I worked as a security guard," says Garrison.

He says all this experience is one advantage to being 52. The disadvantage?

"Employers are looking for the younger individuals. They can create new ideas. You know, I can create new ideas too," he says.

Phyllis Cohn, with AARP, was on hand to give job seekers like Garrison a few tips. Like search online for jobs, not just in the newspaper. And Cohn says let younger employers know...

"Just because I look like your mother or father who tells you that we know everything, that is not what I'm bringing to the table. I'm bringing an openness and a willingness to also share what I have, " says Cohn.

The unemployment rate in April for those 50 and older was 7 percent.

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