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Chesapeake Bay Foundation Settles Lawsuit With EPA

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William Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation,  
announces the group's settlement with Environmental Protection Agency.
Sabri Ben-Achour
William Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, announces the group's settlement with Environmental Protection Agency.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation has announced the settlement of its lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency.

For decades, plans to rehabilitate the Chesapeake Bay have come and gone, none of them with enough legal authority to actually rehabilitate anything. William Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, lays particular blame on the previous administration.

"The Bush administration was missing in action," he says. "We literally did not see any improvement in those eight years. That's why we had to sue the federal government."

Since the suit in 2009, President Obama reversed the agency's course and signed an executive order mandating a federal strategy to clean up the bay. Baker announced today that the lawsuit has been settled.

"This agreement is a game changer; this agreement is going to lead to pollution reduction in the Chesapeake Bay, and if it doesn't, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation will be back in court," he says.

The settlement requires the EPA to develop enforceable limits and controls over the pollution that goes into the Bay and to do so on a set schedule over the next two years.

The Bay Foundation says the settlement is legally binding and would survive changes in administrations.

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