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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, May 11, 2010

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D.C. has plenty to offer the reluctant globetrotter this week, from transatlantic travel to total circumnavigation.

(May 12) GERMAN WRAP The Smithsonian American Art Museum explores the environmental art of quintessential couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude in To the German People: Wrapped Reichstag tomorrow night at 6 in Northwest DC. Christo will be on hand to discuss the sheer size of the project, in which the dynamic duo wrapped the entire German Parliament building in polypropylene.

(May 12-August 22) TRANSITIONS Meanwhile, the fabric of South African identity is examined in Paul Emmanuel's Transitions, opening tomorrow at the National Museum of African Art, on display through late August. Emmanuel employs various media to explore his identity as a young white male living in post-apartheid South Africa.

(May 12-30) AROUND THE WORLD, AROUND THE WORLD And Round House Theatre continues to stage Mark Brown's adaptation of Around the World in 80 Days through the end of May. Five actors defy the laws of physics to play 39 characters in this madcap travelogue.

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