Violent Crime In Maryland Down In 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Violent Crime In Maryland Down In 2009

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By Elliott Francis

Maryland's rate of violent crime for 2009 recorded it's lowest level since 1975. One reason for the reduction is the improving crime record of Prince George's County, Maryland.

The numbers show overall crime also declined to it's lowest level in more than 35 years. It's a historic reduction, made possible by many across the state, and one county in particular, according to Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley.

"Prince George's County is doing some remarkable things," he says, "driving overall crime down to it's lowest level in over 30 years. None of it happens by chance; it happens because of partnerships."

These partnerships between local watchdog groups and police are credited with crafting tough measures against violent repeat offenders, tightening parole and probation standards, targeting at-risk youth and re-evaluating DNA samples, which led to the arrest of additional violent offenders.

"That's critical," says Prince George's County Police Chief Roberto Hylton. "It's the community saying these guys, the police, mean what they say, so let's come together and work with them. I think we have that credibility with them now."

The same survey also showed automobile theft in the county has dropped to the lowest level since 1985.

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