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Insurance Group Urges ABS Brakes for Bikes

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An insurance association wants safer braking systems but some motorcyclists disagree.
An insurance association wants safer braking systems but some motorcyclists disagree.

By Peter Granitz

An insurance association is pushing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to require motorcycles have anti-lock breaks. But some local motorcyclists are skeptical about the law's ability to reduce accidents.

Adrian Lund heads the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Lund wants the federal government to enforce, what he calls, minimum safety standards for vehicles. A federal law could take years to implement.

“In the meantime motorcyclists will see the data we’re putting out there and how much additional protection they have by having ABS breaks,” says Lund.

But Ron Love says there are times he needs to lock his back break so he doesn’t crash, allowing him to skid his bike out in a relatively controlled way.

“You know you’re going down, but you don't know how you’re going down. You may not know where you end up when you stop, but you know how you’re going down. You know you’re not going down in a manner where you’re going to break your neck,” says Love.

Love says this law could result in more experienced bikers crashing because it limits a tactic they learned in bike-safety courses.


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