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'Near-miss' On Metrorail Makes Riders Uneasy

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By Jonathan Wilson

Metro is touting a new general manager and a new focus on safety, but a close-call on the tracks earlier this week has some riders less than optimistic about the transit agency's near future.

A metro spokesperson says the near-collision on the Red Line this week, close to the Forest Glen station, shows that the transit system has been wise to operate trains only in manual mode.

Metro made the change after the Red Line crash last summer that left nine people dead.

In Wednesday's incident, a driver was able to slam on the manual emergency brake after getting too close to a stopped train.

This morning, red line commuter Donovan Wilson says the incident has him concerned.

"It's reassuring that the operator has enough freedom to make adjustments, but from a rider's standpoint it still just shows that Metro is still falling apart," says Wilson.

No injuries were reported in the near-collision. Metro is still investigating why it happened.


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