Virginia Congressman Wants Japan To Resolve Abduction Cases Of U.S. Children | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Congressman Wants Japan To Resolve Abduction Cases Of U.S. Children

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By Sara Sciammacco

A Virginia congressman is bringing attention to American children who he says have been unlawfully taken to Japan.

Democrat Jim Moran got involved after several of his constituents came to him for help. Douglas Berg was one of them. He has two children that he says were taken to Japan by their mother last year. Berg hasn't heard from them since.

"Their mother has decided to cut off all communications with me and even refused a Department of State wellness visit to determine the children's safety," says Berg.

Congressman Moran says the State Department is working on similar cases that involve more than 100 abducted children.

"Under our laws this is kidnapping and under international laws this is kidnapping. They have been kidnapped by a parent with Japanese citizenship, following often times the disillusion of their relationship with the American parent," says Moran.

Moran introduced a resolution condemning Japan's refusal to return the children to the U.S., and calls on the Japanese government to resolve all the abduction cases.

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