: News

Groups Say Wind Energy Losing Out Amidst Storm Over Oil

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Virginia is poised to be the first new state to drill for oil and natural gas, and a coalition of environmental groups is launching protests and petitions to stop those plans. They argue that the potential for wind energy is being ignored.

Glen Besa heads the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club. He says despite Governor Bob McDonnell's promises to promote wind energy, funds for renewable research programs have been cut.

"The state of Virginia is falling behind adjoining states because we have no incentives for renewable energy," says Besa.

He points to Pennsylvania, also a coal producing state, but one that has invested more in wind.

"And there's four manufacturing plants by Gemesa, a Spanish firm that are located there, creating over a thousand jobs in the off shore wind industry," he says.

A report by the Virginia Coastal Energy Research Consortium in March found that wind farms could generate 10,000 jobs, and could be cost competitive with coal plants if a wind industry were created in the commonwealth. Public funding for that research consortium was eliminated in the last budget.

NPR

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Yes, the green aprons remain, but you may begin noticing more personal flair underneath. Instead of black and white garments, baristas are now free to embrace "drabby chic."
NPR

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Yes, the green aprons remain, but you may begin noticing more personal flair underneath. Instead of black and white garments, baristas are now free to embrace "drabby chic."
NPR

The Obamas And The White House's Slave Legacy

The Obamas have repeatedly used their platform to remind the public that the White House was built by slaves. Of course, not everyone is enthralled, or even convinced that this history is real.
NPR

FBI Investigates Possible Russian Connection To Leaked DNC Emails

Hackers tied to two Russian intelligence agencies breached DNC computers in May, but whether the same hackers turned over thousands of emails to WikiLeaks is still under investigation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.