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Bill Would Make DC, MD, VA Teen Driving Laws Uniform

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The Standup and Save11 Act is supported by consumer and medical groups, as well as by insurance companies such as Allstate.
Jonathan Wilson
The Standup and Save11 Act is supported by consumer and medical groups, as well as by insurance companies such as Allstate.

By Jonathan Wilson

The onset of warm weather usually coincides with a slew of high school proms each year, and with that comes a fresh round of concerns about teen driving.

On the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, 11 teens lined up sporting black tee-shirts. Each shirt showed a number, from one to 11, signifying the 11 teen lives claimed each day in auto-related deaths.

Montgomery Police Captain Thomas Didone spoke at the event, organized in support of a federal bill called the Standup and Save11 act.

Didone, who lost his teen son to a car crash a few years ago, says what the country needs is state-to-state uniformity for teen driving laws.

"Without the uniformity, we're not going to be able to get everybody on the same page, and on board to do the enforcement," he says.

The bill would, among other things, make talking on a cellphone or texting while driving a primary offense for teens.

Right now in Maryland and Virginia, police must see a teen breaking another law before they can cite them for using a phone in the car.

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