: News

Bill Would Make DC, MD, VA Teen Driving Laws Uniform

Play associated audio
The Standup and Save11 Act is supported by consumer and medical groups, as well as by insurance companies such as Allstate.
Jonathan Wilson
The Standup and Save11 Act is supported by consumer and medical groups, as well as by insurance companies such as Allstate.

By Jonathan Wilson

The onset of warm weather usually coincides with a slew of high school proms each year, and with that comes a fresh round of concerns about teen driving.

On the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, 11 teens lined up sporting black tee-shirts. Each shirt showed a number, from one to 11, signifying the 11 teen lives claimed each day in auto-related deaths.

Montgomery Police Captain Thomas Didone spoke at the event, organized in support of a federal bill called the Standup and Save11 act.

Didone, who lost his teen son to a car crash a few years ago, says what the country needs is state-to-state uniformity for teen driving laws.

"Without the uniformity, we're not going to be able to get everybody on the same page, and on board to do the enforcement," he says.

The bill would, among other things, make talking on a cellphone or texting while driving a primary offense for teens.

Right now in Maryland and Virginia, police must see a teen breaking another law before they can cite them for using a phone in the car.

NPR

Texas Bookseller Picks 3 Summer Reads

Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
NPR

He Used To Live On The Streets Of Mumbai. Now, His Cafe Welcomes Everyone

Amin Sheikh's new cafe is a rarity in class-stratified India: It's open to people from all walks of life. Sheikh is a former street child, and so are many of his employees.
NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

Donald Trump promises to help bring jobs and security to black neighborhoods. But his poll numbers with African-Americans are in the low single digits, and many say his message is insulting.
NPR

WATCH: Squishy 'Octobot' Moves Autonomously

The robot designed by a team from Harvard University moves without the help of any rigid parts. Researchers say it is the first proof-of-concept design for an entirely soft, autonomous machine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.