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Kennedy Center Receives Money For Management Training

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By Stephanie Kaye

At the Kennedy Center, a $22 million grant will fund the training institute that teaches the behind-the-scenes work of arts organizations.

The Kennedy Center has operated its management institute for nine years, says President Michael Kaiser.

"We spend billions of dollars training the artists, and very small amounts training the people who have to employ them. I'm trying to help fix that," says Kaiser.

But funding for the institute fell through in 2008, when an pledge from investment advisor Alberto Vilar was canceled. Vilar was convicted of fraud, and Kaiser wasn't sure whether he would be able to keep the institute going.

"The question is how long would it survive and certainly would it survive after I was no longer at the Kennedy Center," he says.

It now has a future training arts administrators and managers.

"We teach how do you plan your programming, we teach about doing strategic planning in general, we teach about fundraising and marketing," he says.

Kaiser will step down as president of the Kennedy Center in four years to take up the work of its management institute full-time.


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