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Validity Questioned At Maryland Nursing Facility

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The Maryland State Attorney General is suing the Associated National Medical Academy for deceptive marketing. The company operates out of an office building in downtown Baltimore.
Cathy Duchamp
The Maryland State Attorney General is suing the Associated National Medical Academy for deceptive marketing. The company operates out of an office building in downtown Baltimore.

By Cathy Duchamp

Maryland state prosecutors are demanding information from an education company in Baltimore. It's been charged with deceptive marketing practices for offering unauthorized nursing training.

The Maryland attorney generals office says an outfit called the Associated National Medical Academy does not have the necessary state approval to sell the training programs it offers to become a Licensed Practical Nurse or an R.N. Here’s what happened when we tried to reach the Academy for a response.

[intercom] Yes, you’re not welcome in the facility

[reporter]What was that?

[intercom]You’re not welcome in the facility and we have no comment.

State prosecutors don’t know how many people signed up for the classes, or how much they paid. That’s because the Academy’s principals have refused to turn over documents with student names or tuition bills.

In charging papers prosecutors say the Academy told Maryland residents they could take their licensing exams in Virginia and then work in Maryland under a multi-state compact. In reality, they wouldn't be able to even sit for the exam.

A hearing has been set for June 2.

The Maryland Hospital Association calls this a case of "buyer beware." It urges would-be nurses to check a programs credentials on the Maryland Board of Nursing website.

[website address is http://209.60.234.65/mdbon_weblookup/]

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