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Church Leaders Speak Out Against Immigration Bill

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By Peter Granitz

Local civic rights activists are staking positions against the Arizona immigration bill. There are more than just Latino-rights groups opposing the measure.

The bill would make it a state crime for a person to be in Arizona illegally. The federal government has controlled immigration enforcement in the past.

The national office of the NAACP opposes the plan, saying it violates the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

Reverend James Coleman is the chaplain for the Washington D.C. branch and says his chapter still needs to vote whether to endorse or oppose the measure.

Still, he says he’s personally opposed to the plan, and many people in Washington can relate.

“Certainly, persons who have been quote, oppressed, can relate to the sensitivity to any profile,” says Coleman.

Coleman, who is the pastor at All Nation's Baptist Church, says he's discussing the measure with fellow ministers in the region, and more of his congregants are starting to raise the issue with him.

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