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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, May 3, 2010

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Baltimore's artists shine a light on the medical and ephemeral at a show in the John Fonda Gallery through May 30.
Caitlin Cunningham and Alex Ebstein
Baltimore's artists shine a light on the medical and ephemeral at a show in the John Fonda Gallery through May 30.

(May 3-30) ANODYNE ART To cure the malaise of Monday, Baltimore's John Fonda Gallery housed in the Theatre Project on West Preston Street has just what the doctor ordered. The show Natural Remedies reflects on health and medicine through a psychedelic lens of goache and color through the end of May.

(May 3-24) FACTORY MADE Newly minted theater collective Factory 449 presents its first annual play reading series, Factory Made, on the four Mondays of May at the Church Street Theatre in Northwest DC. You can catch the first installment, In The Flesh, a macabre meditation on the metaphysical, tonight at 7:30.

(May 10-31) SO, YOU THINK YOU CAN'T SING And if you want to take your singing from the shower to the stage, the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda offers a crash course in harmonizing that's bound to help your sound. Veteran vocalist John Horman shows unsure singers how to blend their voices in ensembles during So You Think You Can't Sing, a four-week foray kicking off next Monday.

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