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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, May 3, 2010

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Baltimore's artists shine a light on the medical and ephemeral at a show in the John Fonda Gallery through May 30.
Caitlin Cunningham and Alex Ebstein
Baltimore's artists shine a light on the medical and ephemeral at a show in the John Fonda Gallery through May 30.

(May 3-30) ANODYNE ART To cure the malaise of Monday, Baltimore's John Fonda Gallery housed in the Theatre Project on West Preston Street has just what the doctor ordered. The show Natural Remedies reflects on health and medicine through a psychedelic lens of goache and color through the end of May.

(May 3-24) FACTORY MADE Newly minted theater collective Factory 449 presents its first annual play reading series, Factory Made, on the four Mondays of May at the Church Street Theatre in Northwest DC. You can catch the first installment, In The Flesh, a macabre meditation on the metaphysical, tonight at 7:30.

(May 10-31) SO, YOU THINK YOU CAN'T SING And if you want to take your singing from the shower to the stage, the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda offers a crash course in harmonizing that's bound to help your sound. Veteran vocalist John Horman shows unsure singers how to blend their voices in ensembles during So You Think You Can't Sing, a four-week foray kicking off next Monday.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

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