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Students, Friends Remember Killed Principal

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Friends of killed principal Brian Betts celebrated his memory with a memorial at the Strathmore Arts Center Saturday.
Peter Granitz
Friends of killed principal Brian Betts celebrated his memory with a memorial at the Strathmore Arts Center Saturday.

By Peter Granitz

Friends, family and former students of murdered D.C. public school principal Brian Betts continue to express their sympathy, two weeks after his death.

People whom Betts touched are sharing their stories. Saturday morning hundreds of people gathered at the Strathmore Center to memorialize Betts.

Bryant Boatng was a student of Betts' a decade ago, but they stayed in touch. Now a junior at Bowie State University, Boatng says he wants to follow in Betts' footsteps. He's doing his teaching practicum now and hopes to one day be a principal.

"Just because I see how many people, how many lives he touched," says Boatng. "I want to be a part of that. If he could help me out, and I could help somebody else out, keep people off the streets, kids of all different races and backgrounds - that's my goal."

Boatng says Betts created a network of students of all ages who can turn to one another when they need advice.

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