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Rhee Says She Will Find the Money For the Contract

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By Patrick Madden

D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee says she believes the city has found the money to fund the proposed teachers contract.

The tentative agreement relies on private donations to help fund salary increases for teachers. But the Districts Chief Financial Officer Natwar Gandhi has refused to certify the contract until the city shows it can pay for the deal if the private foundations back out.

Rhee says shes identified enough money in the schools budget and from other sources to close the 34 million dollar gap but, she admits, it wouldve been easier to have had the CFO sign off on the deal before announcing the agreement.

"In hindsight now I think that would have been a better way to go I will know for future negotiations that we should at least define those parameters on the front end," Rhee said.

The CFO's office still needs to look at the proposed cost-cutting moves before it can certify the contract.

Rhee and Gandhi say they'll work more closely in the future.

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