Volunteers Help Bring Grass Back to Chesapeak Bay | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Volunteers Help Bring Grass Back to Chesapeak Bay

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

The Chesapeake Bay has about half as much underwater grass as it used to, due to pollution and storms. Things are improving though, thanks to some volunteers who are helping things along, one handful-of-grass at a time.

Karen Skelton and her daughter Elizabeth are trudging through the shallow water at Mason Neck State Park in Virginia.

They are towing tubs full of lush, emerald green underwater grass that they have been pampering in their living room for ten weeks.

"We gave them love and kindness, we made signs around with appreciation for what it's going to do for the Chesapeake Bay and send positive energy and vibes and it worked!" Skelton says. "They're wonderful!"

Libby Norris is a scientist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, she says the grasses help protect the shore from erosion, and help remove sediment from the water.

"It's great stuff, plus all the habitat - all sorts of little fish, crabs all sorts of things come hide in the grass," Norris says.

About 200 volunteers grow tubs of grass every year, and Norris says every strand helps.

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