No More Park Police In Montgomery County? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

No More Park Police In Montgomery County?

Play associated audio

By Matt Bush

Budget woes in Montgomery County, Maryland could mean the end of the county's park police.

Under a plan from County Executive Isiah Leggett, the park police would be merged into the county police department, effectively eliminating the force. Leggett claims the move would save the county approximately $2 million.

Park Police Chief Darien Manley says the move would make parks more dangerous, something he says is proven by more than crime statistics.

"The proof is in the incredible usage and visitation we see every day," he says. "It's seen in the youth leagues using our fields and facilities and the young families in our local parks and in our playgrounds. It's seen in the walkers and joggers and bicyclists who travel our trails everyday. They use the parks because they feel safe."

Manley also worries many of his officers would not meet training requirements for the county police force, and would lose their jobs.

NPR

How Dorothea Lange Taught Us To See Hunger And Humanity

Perhaps no one did more to show us the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photos of farm workers and others have become iconic of the era.
NPR

How Dorothea Lange Taught Us To See Hunger And Humanity

Perhaps no one did more to show us the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photos of farm workers and others have become iconic of the era.
NPR

Test Of '1 Person, 1 Vote' Heads To The Supreme Court

Analysts have noted that dividing districts based on eligible voters rather than total population would tend to shift representative power to localities with fewer children and fewer immigrants.
NPR

In A Digital Chapter, Paper Notebooks Are As Relevant As Ever

Is paper just a curiosity of the nostalgic? It turns out that digital natives think paper works in tandem with our devices. Research agrees that old-school note taking offers benefits a screen can't.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.