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Ward Seven Welcomes New Anacostia Library

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By Peter Granitz

Thelma Jones says it’s been years since her neighborhood has had a permanent library. But today marks a new era. The new green building can hold 80,000 books. And even on a rainy, gray day, the windows throughout the building let enough light in to read just about anywhere.

"And a lot of people have been telling me they’re going to be coming down here because of the access to computers and the new technology," she says.

Thirty-two brand new computers, in fact. And wireless internet, too.

Brandon Simms is ready to take advantage of it all. He says the library couldn’t open soon enough. The 25-year-old had been using the interim library three times a week to search for jobs.

"The interim was closed for three weeks," he says. "There was nothing in this area for the people to go and get on the internet or handle their business. They probably had to go to the other side."

The Anacostia library opening is one of a string of new libraries in the District, with one on Benning Road opening earlier this month and new ones in Shaw and Georgetown later this year.

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