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Funeral For Dorothy Height To Be Held At Washington National Cathedral

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By Rebecca Blatt

Several events scheduled for next week will honor civil rights pioneer Dorothy Height, who died this week at Howard University Hospital.

Height's body will lie in repose for a public viewing Tuesday at the National Council of Negro Women's headquarters building, which bears her name.

Memorial services are scheduled Wednesday at Howard University and Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington. On Thursday funeral services for Height will be held at the National Cathedral.

Alexis Herman, the former U.S. Secretary of Labor who is overseeing the arrangements, says Height will be buried afterward at Fort Lincoln Cemetery in Maryland.

Height marched alongside Martin Luther King Junior and led the National Council of Negro Women for 40 years. She died Tuesday at 98.

See the NBC 4 video below to learn more about Height's civil rights work:

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

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