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Charges Dropped Against 14-Year-Old In Drive-By Shooting

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By Patrick Madden

Two more people have been charged in last month's mass shooting in Southeast D.C. and another suspect is being sought by police. At the same time, prosecutors have dropped the charges against a 14-year-old accused in the case. The teen had faced 41 counts, including first degree murder. Authorities now say they had the wrong person.

It took a finger print analysis to confirm what some witnesses and suspects had been telling police and prosecutors. The 14-year-old was not the driver of the getaway vehicle involved in the March 30th shooting that left 4 people dead and five injured.

"In a perfect world we would never have mistakes. The circumstances leading to the probable cause hearing were such that both we and the court believed there was probable cause at that time," says D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles.

Nickles also criticized the Washington Examiner for disclosing the name of the 14-year-old and with a judge's permission took the unusual step of naming the teen to publicly exonerate him.


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