: News

Filed Under:

Anti-Tobacco Agency In D.C. Faces Uncertain Future

Play associated audio
The anti-tobacco efforts of the American Lung Association of D.C. has an uncertain future.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mustafanafees/
The anti-tobacco efforts of the American Lung Association of D.C. has an uncertain future.

By Rebecca Sheir

The American Lung Association of D.C. is moving its staff and services to a local hospital. But it's uncertain how long the anti-tobacco efforts of one of the District's oldest non-profit health organizations will continue.

Regional restructuring prompted the American Lung Association to close ALADC. But a grant from the D.C. Cancer Consortium and D.C. Department of Health is allowing ALADC to continue its free "Quitline" telephone service and other programs.

Under the name "Breathe D.C.," the agency is now housed at United Medical Center, where "the residents of the District of Columbia will still be able to receive nicotine-replacement therapy and tobacco cessation programs as if nothing happened," says Calvin Smith, board chair of the UMC Foundation.

Smith says the $850,000 grant ends September 30th, but the medical center's foundation is working to extend that date.

Still, Angela Bradbury is worried. The co-founder of a grassroots group that promotes smoke-free workplaces says "it's great the smoking rate in the District went down from 20.9 percent in 2004 to 16.2 percent in 2008. But if you don't keep working on it, it likely will go up again."

And if it does, she says, more people will get sick, health care costs will rise, and everything ALADC has achieved since its inception in the early 1900s could be lost.

NPR

From Tahrir To Tiananmen, 'City Squares' Can't Escape Their History

Governments have tried to erase the evidence of some squares' troubled pasts, but that doesn't mean they've been forgotten. A new book gathers writers' thoughts about famous squares around the world.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

10 Years After Immigration Protests, What Has Changed?

Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, Fermin Vasquez of the SEIU and Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies discuss the legacy of 10 years of activism for immigration reform.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.