Shifting Gears: The Retooling Of The U.S. Auto Industry, Part Two | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Shifting Gears: The Retooling Of The U.S. Auto Industry, Part Two

Play associated audio

In this second part of Shifting Gears, host Craig Fahle talks with The Story's Dick Gordon about the South as the new home of the US auto industry, with all of its complex social, labor and financial questions.

Next, we visit Julie Kredens from Louisville Public Media for a tale of two vehicle plants and how their fortunes have hit the pockets of auto workers nearby.

Finally, a glimpse into the future and where auto designers think consumers want to go.

These fast-moving programs are anchored from WDET-Detroit and transition to hosts and guests in multiple cities. Station editorial partners include Louisville Public Radio, KCUR-Kansas City and WUNC/The Story-Chapel Hill. Lead producers are Kate Hinds from WNYC, Ron Jones and primary host Craig Fahle, both from WDET. Funding for the specials comes from the [EconomyStory] (http://www.economystory.org/) project from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

NPR

Impressionist Hero Édouard Manet Gets The Star Treatment In Los Angeles

Manet was not himself an Impressionist, but he mightily influenced the movement. Two of his paintings are now in L.A. The Railway is making its West Coast debut, and Spring just sold for $65 million.
NPR

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

Scientists have recovered cultivated wheat DNA from an 8,000-year-old submerged site off the British coast. The finding suggests hunter-gatherers were trading for the grain long before they grew it.
NPR

Jeb Bush Takes 2016 Show Into Unfriendly Territory At CPAC

Bush has appeared almost exclusively before friendly audiences since leaving the Florida governorship eight years ago, but today he faces a crowd of conservative activists.
NPR

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

New Hampshire is the first state to outlaw voting booth selfies. Some call the ban unconstitutional and are challenging it in court. Others argue selfies compromise privacy and enable voter coercion.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.