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Businesses Make Sustainability The Bottom Line

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

Sustainability is a major theme of Earthday, and several local businesses are showing that it doesn't take much effort.

Terrence Jones is the CEO of Wolftrap, and he made it his mission a few years ago to reduce its carbon footprint. They did a whole list of things.

"All of our light fixtures have been changed," says Jones.

The thermostat was turned down.

"Wearing a sweater in the winter is a good idea," he says.

There's less packaging at the concession stands, Wolftrap's catering business started composting. Now, all of this might sound a little, underwhelming, but that's kind of the point.

"They seem like such little things but when you add them up, it makes a huge difference in the foot print you're leaving," he says.

Wolftrap cut it's landfill waste in half. Energy use is down by almost a third. Over in Bethesda, Maryland Lockheed Martin had similar results but on a bigger scale - it trimmed it's water and electricity use at all of its branches nationwide.

"Not only is it the right thing to do, it's the right thing to do for the people, for the environment and for the business," says David Constable, a vice president at Lockheed Martin.

"Last year we alone we saved about thirteen million dollars," he says.

All from flipping off the lights, and fixing that leaky faucet.


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