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Shifting Gears: The Retooling Of The U.S. Auto Industry, Part One

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The global economic crisis and the U.S.-based credit collapse have pushed a challenged U.S. auto industry into uncertain territory. With approximately one in ten American jobs touched by the auto industry, how are communities feeling the affect of this transition?

Over two, one-hour programs, Shifting Gears will hear from plant workers, car dealers, consumers and civic leaders in cities from Detroit to the Midwest and through the South in an exploration of the changing nature of the U.S. car business. You'll hear interviews with people on the edge of the industrial shift and how it is touching lives, careers, communities and civic life.

These fast-moving programs are anchored from WDET-Detroit and transition to hosts and guests in multiple cities. Station editorial partners include Louisville Public Radio, KCUR-Kansas City and WUNC/The Story-Chapel Hill. Lead producers are Kate Hinds from WNYC, Ron Jones and primary host Craig Fahle, both from WDET. Funding for the specials comes from the [EconomyStory (http://www.economystory.org/) project from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


French Bulldog At Heart Of New Children's Book 'Naughty Mabel'

Mabel is a naughty French bulldog at the center of a new children's book by Nathan Lane and Devlin Elliott. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Lane about his inspiration for the fictional dog.

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It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

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Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

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