: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Approves Medical Marijuana Bill

Play associated audio

By Patrick Madden

With little fanfare or debate, the medical marijuana bill cleared an important hurdle in the council Tuesday. Members unanimously approved the measure, which creates five medical marijuana dispensaries, and limits the amount chronically ill patients can receive to about two ounces of marijuana per month. The council will take a final vote on the bill in two weeks.

D.C. could become the 14th state to legalize medical marijuana, and the bill's sponsor Council Member David Catania says the proposal looks at other states to see what's worked and what hasn't.

"This legislation seeks to avoid those problems, while ensuring that the District moves forward with a medical marijuana program based on evidence and best practices," says Catania.

D.C. voters overwhelmingly supported legalizing medical marijuana in 1998, but until late last year Congress blocked the law from being enacted.

NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

WAMU 88.5

Implications Of The Supreme Court's Immigration Ruling

Many undocumented immigrants are living in fear after a Supreme Court ruling effectively barred deferred deportation for 4 million people. What the ruling means for families across the country and how immigration policy is playing out in 2016 election politics.

NPR

Virtual Reality Aimed At The Elderly Finds New Fans

Some doctors are finding that virtual travel — to Venice, a Hawaiian beach or Africa — can open new worlds to people confined by low mobility, dementia, or depression.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.