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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, April 21, 2010

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The drawing's on the wall at the Walters in Baltimore.
The Walters Art Museum
The drawing's on the wall at the Walters in Baltimore.

(April 22) MOTOR CITY MUSIC The Motor City sound goes symphonic this Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the vocal virtuosos of Spectrum pay tribute to Motown, replete with period costumes and choreography. If you miss Thursday's show, you can catch it at the Meyerhoff in Baltimore this weekend.

(April 23) AMNESTY ART The art of Amnesty takes over Silver Spring this weekend in Amnesty International's first ever Human Rights Art Festival. The multi-venue event brings together artists using socially transformative media in order to raise awareness of human rights and justice issues. You can join artists, politicians, and local business folk for the conversation Friday through Sunday.

(April 21-July 3) ON THE HORIZON And the drawing is on the wall in Baltimore at the Walters Art Museum, showcasing recent additions to its collection during Expanding Horizons. Drawings and watercolors from 19th century French artists will be on display through July.

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