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Gun Enthusiasts Rally In Northern Virginia

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Speakers and participants of the Restore the Constitution rally were armed.
Michael Pope
Speakers and participants of the Restore the Constitution rally were armed.

By Michael Pope

Some supporters of the Second Amendment say they won't stop with armed protests against what they see as increasing federal intrusion. They plan on taking their concerns to the ballot box later this year.

Participants of the Restore the Constitution rally say the county's fundamental principles are being eroded. Bob Wright is a militia leader from New Mexico.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we live in a time when the thought of gun enthusiasts bringing guns to a gun rally brings out the press because our political dialogue has developed into this cartoon character of professional wrestling," says Wright.

Approximately 75 armed protesters, including Andrew Graves from Vermont, showed up.

"Most of us are libertarians, we want smaller federal government. We want the government to play by the rulebook, the rulebook being the constitution," says Graves.

There were also a handful of counter-demonstrators like Laura Austin.

"I find it very ironic that they are complaining about the federal government and we are in a national park which is paid for by federal tax dollars," says Austin.

Organizers say they chose the date to commemorate the start of the Revolutionary War and that the timing had nothing to do with the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.


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